Category: Native Landscape Planning & Design

NATIVE PLANT GARDEN PREP – THE NITTY-GRITTY OF LAWN REMOVAL

By Karen Vanderwall Many of you are looking at your tired thirsty lawns right now, thinking I should get rid of it! It’s a daunting task, you are also probably thinking. Once you’ve worked through the challenging decision to replace some or all of your lawn to a native garden, the next challenge is how […] Continue reading "NATIVE PLANT GARDEN PREP – THE NITTY-GRITTY OF LAWN REMOVAL"

Book Review: Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond by Brad Lancaster

Review by Pam Sherman Brad Lancaster lives in a city which gets 11 inches of rain a year. Tucson AZ is one water-stressed city in the desert, getting its city water from the Colorado River 300 miles away. He writes: “we’d typically have more free local water than we need if we’d consciously harvest it, […] Continue reading "Book Review: Rainwater Harvesting for Drylands and Beyond by Brad Lancaster"

Time for Coloradoscaping to Replace Xeriscaping

By Richard Phillips In the dry steppe environment of eastern Colorado, for years we have been directed to reduce the water consumption of our landscaping by using the Xeriscaping guidelines developed and promoted by Denver Water, since the 1980s. These concepts have been so ingrained in our gardening ethic, that I see them referenced in […] Continue reading "Time for Coloradoscaping to Replace Xeriscaping"

What Drought Tolerant Plant Species Can Help Prevent Wind Erosion and Rebuild the Soil?

This question and answer are part of our Ask CSU Extension Anything (About Native Plants) series. We appreciate CSU Extension for answering these questions to expand our community’s knowledge of native plant landscaping. Send us your questions to the Ask CSU email account. FULL QUESTION: In a drought with significant wind erosion, are there any strategies […] Continue reading "What Drought Tolerant Plant Species Can Help Prevent Wind Erosion and Rebuild the Soil?"

What Native Plants Work Well as Both a Windbreak and a Shelter Belt for Native Birds and Insects?

This question and answer are part of our Ask CSU Extension Anything (About Native Plants) series. We appreciate CSU Extension for answering these questions to expand our community’s knowledge of native plant landscaping. Send us your questions to the Ask CSU email account. FULL QUESTION: I have 35 acres in Elizabeth. Rolling hills, native grasslands and […] Continue reading "What Native Plants Work Well as Both a Windbreak and a Shelter Belt for Native Birds and Insects?"

Colorado Native Plants for Caterpillars and Birds

By Deborah Lebow Aal If you are reading this, you have some familiarity with, and/or, some interest in the interdependence of native plants and native insects. Some native plants provide the ecosystem with more benefits for insects than others. The measure I am using for ecosystem benefits is how many species of caterpillars a native […] Continue reading "Colorado Native Plants for Caterpillars and Birds"

Fostering Soil Biology in our Native Plant Gardens

By Christine Gust Note: You may learn more about soil biology from Christine on January 24, 2024, when she hosts a Wild Ones Front Range webinar on soils and native plants. Registration details will be published in the upcoming weeks. Plants use sunlight to convert carbon dioxide into energy (sugars). Plants release some of these […] Continue reading "Fostering Soil Biology in our Native Plant Gardens"

What combination of drought tolerant native grasses and sedges would you recommend as a “green mulch” between masses of flowering plants?

This question and answer are part of our Ask CSU Extension Anything (About Native Plants) series. We appreciate CSU Extension for answering these questions to expand our community’s knowledge of native plant landscaping. Send us your questions to the Ask CSU email account. FULL QUESTION: I’ve been hearing/reading a lot about using a combination of native […] Continue reading "What combination of drought tolerant native grasses and sedges would you recommend as a “green mulch” between masses of flowering plants?"